Jan Tenbruggencate

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Aliʻi Wahine

By Jan TenBruggencate Queen Kaahumanu with her servant on rug, lithograph by Jean-Pierre Norblin de la Gourdaine in 1822 after painting by Louis Choris, the artist aboard the Russian ship Rurick, which visited Hawai‘i in 1816. The role of women in early Hawaiian society was different from that of most other native cultures. [...]

By | 2017-03-24T09:34:00+00:00 March 23rd, 2017|0 Comments

Hawai‘i Love Legends

By Jan TenBruggencate 'Princess Kaia,' a modern artistic portrait shot by Daniel Finchum, exploring Hawaiian history and culture. Finchum uses wet plate collodion, a photographic technique developed in the 1850s, to add an antique feeling to his portraits. Hawai‘i is famous for its love stories, both real and imagined. Among the most tragic [...]

By | 2017-02-06T08:22:56+00:00 February 6th, 2017|0 Comments

The Beautiful Hibiscus

By Jan TenBruggencate A Hibiscus waimea subsp. Hannarae, or koki‘o ke‘oke‘o in Hawaiian, seen here in Hanakāpī‘ai Valley, Nāpali Coast. Photo by Seana Walsh/NTBG On a slope next to a trail, just above a stream on Kaua‘i’s Na Pali coast, I came across a clutch of gorgeous tiny hibiscus flowers on a series [...]

By | 2017-02-02T07:39:52+00:00 January 31st, 2017|0 Comments

When We Were Young

By Jan TenBruggencate Old coffee containers in display at Kaua‘i Coffee in Kalaheo. Things were different when I was a kid. It’s hard to even image how different. It was just after World War II. The folks around us had gone through the privations of the Great Depression and severe shortages during World [...]

By | 2016-12-10T11:04:58+00:00 December 10th, 2016|0 Comments

Hawaiian Party Food

By Jan TenBruggencate Pono Market in Kapa‘a has probably the largest selection of poke types on the island on any given day. They also have a popular take-out lunch menu that changes daily. I was standing at the seafood cooler at Safeway the other day, amazed at the array of prepared seafood dishes. [...]

By | 2016-11-13T10:14:24+00:00 November 13th, 2016|0 Comments

Holokū and muʻu

By Jan TenBruggencate An oil painting by Hubert Vos of his wife Kaikilani, done in the gardens of her Nawiliwili home in 1900. The painting was donated in 1997 to the Kaua‘i Historical Society, where it hangs in the entryway. Words have meaning, but meanings can change over time — even when they’re [...]

By | 2016-11-10T05:40:19+00:00 October 8th, 2016|0 Comments

Coconuts in a Nutshell

By Jan TenBruggencate Part of the coconut grove in Waipouli, Kaua‘i’s Eastside, is seen here. The grove was planted by E.H.W. Broadbent in 1914. Photo by Léo Azambuja If you love the look of a coconut, you shouldn’t prune your coconut trees, but if you don’t prune them, you shouldn’t stand under them, [...]

By | 2016-11-10T05:40:22+00:00 September 21st, 2016|0 Comments

Koloa Plantation

By Jan TenBruggencate The smokestack in Old Koloa Town, from the second mill built for Koloa Plantation back in 1841. Photo by Léo Azambuja The Hawaiian sugar industry didn’t start in Koloa, and Koloa wasn’t really the site of the first sugar plantation, but these rural myths aside, this South Kaua‘i community has [...]

By | 2016-11-10T05:40:28+00:00 July 22nd, 2016|0 Comments

How High or Low Can the Oceans Go?

By Jan TenBruggencate Hanalei Bay We think of sea level changes in inches over periods of decades, but over longer time spans, the evidence is for far more dramatic rises and falls. How dramatic? Hundreds of feet different. Whole Hawaiian valley floors today were once underwater when oceans were higher. And some shallow [...]

By | 2016-11-10T05:40:30+00:00 June 18th, 2016|0 Comments

The Nearly Lost Art of Weaving Makaloa

By Jan TenBruggencate Makaloa at Niumalu The loss of wetlands in the Islands to agriculture and development may have resulted in the decline of one of the iconic plants, the tallest of makaloa. This noble sedge, which likes to grow in moist to downright soggy soil, was the source of one of the [...]

By | 2016-11-10T05:40:35+00:00 May 8th, 2016|0 Comments