Jan Tenbruggencate

//Jan Tenbruggencate

Hawaiian Party Food

By Jan TenBruggencate Pono Market in Kapa‘a has probably the largest selection of poke types on the island on any given day. They also have a popular take-out lunch menu that changes daily. I was standing at the seafood cooler at Safeway the other day, amazed at the array of prepared seafood dishes. [...]

By | November 13th, 2016|0 Comments

Holokū and muʻu

By Jan TenBruggencate An oil painting by Hubert Vos of his wife Kaikilani, done in the gardens of her Nawiliwili home in 1900. The painting was donated in 1997 to the Kaua‘i Historical Society, where it hangs in the entryway. Words have meaning, but meanings can change over time — even when they’re [...]

By | October 8th, 2016|0 Comments

Coconuts in a Nutshell

By Jan TenBruggencate Part of the coconut grove in Waipouli, Kaua‘i’s Eastside, is seen here. The grove was planted by E.H.W. Broadbent in 1914. Photo by Léo Azambuja If you love the look of a coconut, you shouldn’t prune your coconut trees, but if you don’t prune them, you shouldn’t stand under them, [...]

By | September 21st, 2016|0 Comments

Koloa Plantation

By Jan TenBruggencate The smokestack in Old Koloa Town, from the second mill built for Koloa Plantation back in 1841. Photo by Léo Azambuja The Hawaiian sugar industry didn’t start in Koloa, and Koloa wasn’t really the site of the first sugar plantation, but these rural myths aside, this South Kaua‘i community has [...]

By | July 22nd, 2016|0 Comments

How High or Low Can the Oceans Go?

By Jan TenBruggencate Hanalei Bay We think of sea level changes in inches over periods of decades, but over longer time spans, the evidence is for far more dramatic rises and falls. How dramatic? Hundreds of feet different. Whole Hawaiian valley floors today were once underwater when oceans were higher. And some shallow [...]

By | June 18th, 2016|0 Comments

The Nearly Lost Art of Weaving Makaloa

By Jan TenBruggencate Makaloa at Niumalu The loss of wetlands in the Islands to agriculture and development may have resulted in the decline of one of the iconic plants, the tallest of makaloa. This noble sedge, which likes to grow in moist to downright soggy soil, was the source of one of the [...]

By | May 8th, 2016|0 Comments

Cane Juice, Hops, Yeast — the 1st Hawaiian Beer

By Jan TenBruggencate Hawaiian sugarcane Early European voyagers got their brew where they could find it. Certainly, ships left their home ports well supplied, generally, with casks of rum, and perhaps bottles of wine, and maybe some traditional barley beer, but by the time they got well into the Pacific, and long months [...]

By | April 25th, 2016|0 Comments

The Hawaiian Horse

By Jan TenBruggencate Daniel Kitch puts a halter on D’Artagnan, an 18-hand white Percheron, at Wai Koa Plantation in Kilauea, Kaua‘i’s North Shore. D’Artagnan is the tallest horse on the island, according to Marti Kitch, owner of Carriage Grove Kaua‘i. Hawai‘i’s proud equestrian traditions started in 1803, more than two centuries ago. The [...]

By | March 10th, 2016|0 Comments

A Whale of a Comeback Tale

By Jan TenBruggencate Photo courtesy E. Lyman – HIHWNMS/ NOAA Permit # 14682 A couple of years ago, a whale popped up in front of me as I was paddling a one-man canoe alone under the cliffs between Maha‘ulepu and Nawiliwili. There wasn’t another human in sight, nor a boat. I was paddling [...]

By | February 21st, 2016|0 Comments

The Sands of Hanalei

By Jan TenBruggencate A mother and her daughter enjoy a rainy day at the beach in Hanalei Bay last December. We think of gorgeous Hanalei as a stable, vast half-moon bay, a two-mile crescent white sand beach and a wide plain of fishponds, river, town and taro. But Hanalei Bay has had a [...]

By | January 19th, 2016|0 Comments