Management Plan Completed for Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge

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Management Plan Completed for Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge

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View of Kīlauea Point from Mōkōlea Point. Photo courtesy of Greg Stutzer

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Wednesday the release of a comprehensive conservation plan outlining the goals, objectives and strategies for managing Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years.

The management plan was developed with input from local, state and federal governments, as well as local communities and other stakeholders, according to a Kīlauea Refuge press release. The plan emphasizes enhancing coastal ecosystems, restoring seabird breeding populations, conducting monitoring and research, and improving visitor services and environmental education.

“This plan reflects the tireless work of the many people who care deeply for the refuge and Kaua‘i’s natural and cultural resources. We are excited to present the plan to the public and continue to work with the community in shaping the refuge’s future!” said Heather Tonneson, Project Leader for the Kaua‘i National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

A Mōlī, or Laysan albatross. Photo courtesy of Amanda Gladics

A Mōlī, or Laysan albatross. Photo courtesy of Amanda Gladics

The draft plan, released in February 2015, analyzed four management alternatives. USFWS evaluated written comments and public input on the draft plan and revised the plan to include the information received. Some changes in the final plan from what was proposed in the draft plan include:

— Public use and access to Kāhili Quarry will continue to be allowed 24 hours a day and the refuge will continue to work with the local community to promote stewardship in the area.

Naupaka kahakai. Photo courtesy of Rosa Say

Naupaka kahakai. Photo courtesy of Rosa Say

— To address transportation issues at Kīlauea Point, USFWS will continue to work with the community to identify short-, medium- and long-term strategies. These might include small-scale operational and infrastructure improvements such as a parking reservation system or options for off-site parking and a shuttle system.

A summary of the management plan is available in the refuge’s latest Planning Update which can also be found at www.fws.gov/kilaueapoint.

The final plan can be downloaded from the refuge website, and CDs and limited printed copies can be requested from the refuge office at 828-1413. Printed copies are also available for review at the Princeville, Līhu‘e, Kapa‘a, Koloa, Hanapēpē and Waimea public libraries.

Kumu Kehaulani Kekua and Halau Palaihiwa O Ka‘ipuwai offering a blessing at the Daniel K. Inouye Kīlauea Point Lighthouse dedication. Photo courtesy of Dennis Velte

Kumu Kehaulani Kekua and Halau Palaihiwa O Ka‘ipuwai offering a blessing at the
Daniel K. Inouye Kīlauea Point Lighthouse dedication. Photo courtesy of Dennis Velte

The Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge was established to preserve and enhance migratory bird nesting colonies, federally listed species and native coastal strand, riparian and aquatic biological diversity, as well as to support incidental fish and wildlife-oriented recreation. The refuge is home to some of the largest populations of nesting seabirds in the main Hawaiian Islands and the historic Daniel K. Inouye Kīlauea Point Lighthouse. In 1988, the refuge was expanded to include Nihokū and Mōkōlea Point.

Visit www.fws.gov for more information.

‘Ilima. Photo courtesy of David Eickhoff

‘Ilima. Photo courtesy of David Eickhoff

 

By | 2016-11-10T05:40:29+00:00 July 7th, 2016|0 Comments

About the Author:

Léo Azambuja, editor of For Kaua‘i, has won multiple journalism awards in the state of Hawai‘i, including investigative and enterprise reporting, spot news and feature writing, photojournalism and online reporting.

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