The Miyagi Maru is seen here at Pier 31 on O‘ahu, ready to take Daini Katsu Maru home. Photo courtesy DLNR

The Miyagi Maru is seen here at Pier 31 on O‘ahu, ready to take Daini Katsu Maru home. Photo courtesy DLNR

The year was 1984. Japanese martial artist Mr. Miyagi took young Danny under his wing and trained him to become a martial artist. Now, 32 years after Hollywood blockbuster The Karate Kid was released, life imitates art, kinda: Miyagi is taking Daini to its final destination.

In what a Japanese captain called an “act of charity,” 20-foot fishing boat Daini Katsu Maru, adrift for more than four years following the Japanese earthquake and tsunami of March 11, 2011, was put aboard much-larger Japanese training vessel Miyagi Maru to be sent back home last weekend.

The Daini Katsu Maru was one of the more than four-dozen small fishing boats that washed ashore in Hawai‘i after the tsunami. The boat turned up at Alan Davis Beach on O‘ahu’s Eastside April 22, 2015. Its identification confirmed it came from Ogatsu-town, Miyagi Prefecture, during the 2011 tsunami, and it was designated as JTMD, or Japan Tsunami Marine Debri.

The Daini Katsu Maru waited since April on O‘ahu to take the long journey home back to Japan.

The Daini Katsu Maru waited since April on O‘ahu to take the long journey home back to Japan. Photo courtesy DLNR

Last Saturday, a crew from the state Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Engineering, trucked the boat to a secured area at Pier 31 on O‘ahu, where it was loaded onto the Miyagi Maru, owned by the Government of Miyagi Prefecture, for its return home.

The captain of the Miyagi Maru, working with Honolulu-based shipping agent Transmarine Navigation Corporation, agreed to take the Daini Katsu Maru back to Japan as “an act of charity,” according to DLNR.

In Japan, the Daini Katsu Maru is slated to become an integral part of a memorial display about the 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami at a local cultural center planned by the newly formed Daini Katsu Maru Preservation Society.

‘My Father Is Guiding His Boat Back’